Tag Archives: democratic responsiveness

Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs likely to shake up state elections in 2022.

The Washington Post correctly notes the electoral implications of the forthcoming decision to gut Roe v. Wade.

“Now, normally low-profile state legislative races and less-prominent gubernatorial contests suddenly hold the potential to become national flash points in the polarizing debate, while state legislative activity will become more significant in shaping abortion laws. Advocates on both sides say they anticipate a grueling, expensive and fierce fight.”

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Joe Manchin–Our Democratic Deficit Goes Deeper than Uncompetitive Gerrymandered Districts

Manchin’s seat is not safe. And still, his version of moderation stands at odds with the views of his own constituents (not just his base). Why would voters believe their votes matter?

The Hill is reporting a new poll that shows “West Virginia voters overwhelmingly back paid leave proposal.”

“The poll, commissioned by Paid Leave for All, found that 80 percent of West Virginia voters support ensuring paid leave for workers suffering from a serious illness, 75 percent back paid leave for workers caring for a sick family member and 72 percent support paid leave for workers caring for a new child. 

. . . The poll found that paid leave is more popular among West Virginia voters than other proposals included in the reconciliation package, such as universal pre-K, which is backed by 54 percent of those surveyed. The paid leave program and the measure to allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices were the only Democratic proposals to earn majority support from voters in the state from every political party.

Senator Manchin, to be sure, has his process-based excuse: The bill should be passed separately and with bipartisan support. And, to be sure, this poll is likely somewhat flawed. But still, why would any voter think her vote mattered in this era of hyper-partisanship?

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