APSA Panels from Law and Political Process Study Group on California Election Reform and on Automated Redistricting

Bruce Cain and I are very happy with the two panels we’ve put together for this year’s annual meeting on behalf of the Law and Political Process Study Group:

California Election Reform: Has It Improved Representation and Participation?

Fri, August 31, 12:00 to 1:30pm, Marriott, OrleansSession Submission Type: Created Panel

Session Description

In recent years, the state of California has adopted a series of election reforms including the California Voting Rights Act, redistricting by non-partisan commissions, a top-two primary for most state and federal offices, and other reforms directed at rules for voting. Do these laws improve representation and participation in California? Do they have unintended consequences? What can other states learn from California’s experience?

Sub Unit

  • Related Groups / Law and Political Process Study Group

Individual Presentations

  • The CVRA Tsunami Rolls Across California – Douglas Mark Johnson, Claremont McKenna College; Justin Levitt, California State University, Long Beach
  • Joaquin Avila’s Noble Dream: The Evolution of the California Voting Rights Act – J. Morgan Kousser, California Institute of Technology
  • The Partisan Consequences of California’s Redistricting Commission – Eric McGhee, Public Policy Institute of California
  • California’s New Vote Center Model: Is Increased Voter Turnout a Reality? – Mindy Romero, UC Davis; Thad Kousser, University of California, San Diego; Eric McGhee, Public Policy Institute of California

Chair

  • Richard L. Hasen UC Irvine School of Law

Discussants

  • Christopher S. Elmendorf UC Davis
  • Kathay Feng Common Cause

The Future of Automated Redistricting Applications

Sat, September 1, 8:00 to 9:30am, Sheraton, Beacon GSession Submission Type: Created Panel

Session Description

Advances in computation now make possible what we thought impossible years ago: computer drawn plans that satisfy multiple redistricting criteria. How can political scientists, the courts, legislatures and IRCs use this tool to improve the redistricting process? How far along in development are the algorithms today and can we expect them to be used in the next round of redistricting. Will this tool help to develop standards that can be used across the country, and if so, how?

Sub Unit

  • Related Groups / Law and Political Process Study Group

Individual Presentations

  • The Loser’s Bonus: Political Geography and Minority Party Representation – Jowei Chen, University of Michigan; Jonathan Rodden, Stanford University
  • From Measures to Standards: Using Simulation to Develop Redistricting Guidelines – Wendy K. Tam Cho, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Bruce E. Cain, Stanford University

Chair

  • Michael P. McDonald University of Florida

Discussants

  • Paul H. Edelman Vanderbilt University
  • Richard H. Pildes NYU
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