If Trump’s Executive Order Ends Up Creating Better Citizenship Data, Could It Be Used by States to Draw CONGRESSIONAL Districts with Equal Numbers of Voter Eligible Persons (and Not Total Population)? Would It Allow for Use in State and Local Districts?

In earlier posts, and in a Slate piece, I explained that both the original reason for trying to include the citizenship question on the census and Trump’s executive order issued yesterday was to allow states to try to draw districts … Continue reading

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Moon Duchin: How to Reason from the Universe of Maps (The Normative Logic of Map Sampling) (Rucho symposium)

The following is a guest post from Moon Duchin, part of the symposium on Partisan Gerrymandering after Rucho: Justice Kagan’s dissent in Rucho states in its opening paragraphs:  “The majority’s abdication comes just when courts across the country, including those below, have … Continue reading

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Michael Morley: Rucho, Legal Fictions, and the Judicial Models of Voters (Rucho Symposium)

The following is a guest post from Michael Morley, part of the symposium on Partisan Gerrymandering after Rucho:             The Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Rucho v. Common Causepresents competing judicial conceptions of American voters.  Justice Kagan’s dissent encourages courts to employ … Continue reading

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All’s Well That Ends Well, or All’s Well That Evenwel? How the Commerce Department May Still Help States to Draw Districts with Equal Numbers of Voter Eligible Persons to Minimize Hispanic (and Democratic) Voting Strength

It is undeniably good news that the Trump Administration decided to abandon the citizenship question in the face of evidence that it would depress turnout especially among those with noncitizens in a household and in light of the Supreme Court’s … Continue reading

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