Drake Law Review Symposium on Political Dysfunction and Constitutional Change

This was a truly great symposium and discussion, now in print. Drake Law Review Volume 61, No. 4, Summer 2013 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW SYMPOSIUM The U.S. Constitution and Political Dysfunction: Is There a Connection? ARTICLES Dedication to Congressman Neal Smith David S. … Continue reading

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“A Primary Cause of Partisanship? Nomination Systems and Legislator Ideology”

McGhee, Masket, Shor, Rogers and McCarty have written this article for AJPS.  Here is the abstract: Many theoretical and empirical accounts of representation argue that primary elections are a polarizing influence. Likewise, many reformers advocate opening party nominations to nonmembers … Continue reading

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Just in Time for the Government Shutdown: Revised Version of Political Dysfunction and Constitutional Change

A few months ago I posted a draft paper, Political Dysfunction and Constitutional Change. It generated some interesting responses, including this Salon piece from Jonathan Bernstein. I have now posted the final draft of the paper, which is appearing in … Continue reading

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“Sure, Congress Is More Partisan. But It’s Also More Honest.”

David Weigel of Slate has this comment on what the new Almanac of American Politics reveals.  His takeaways include confirmation that “the gerrymanders of 2010 have taken most of the country out of play,” but also that: “Gerrymandering isn’t the only reason the GOP … Continue reading

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Litigation Anticipated on NC Voting Changes

The Charlotte Observer has this report on lawsuits anticipated after North Carolina’s Republican Governor Pat McCrory signs a sweeping election bill, as he’s expected to do later this month.  Meanwhile, the Triangle Business Journal reports here on Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper’s opposition to the … Continue reading

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“The Obligation of Members of Congress to Consider Constitutionality While Deliberating and Voting: The Deficiencies of House Rule XII and a Proposed Rule for the United States Senate”

Former Senator Russ Feingold has posted this draft on SSRN.  Here is the abstract: Most scholarly attention on constitutional interpretation is focused on the judicial branch and the role of the judiciary in our system of separation of powers. Nonetheless … Continue reading

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